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What to Watch on Disney+ Star this Weekend

Disney+ Star launched this week for international subscribers and dropped a tonne of sweet films; from high adventure, classics 80's action, beloved comedies and cult classics, it's one of the best content drops of the streaming era. Here are 10 films we're looking forward to watching over the coming days.

1. Commando (1985) 

Retired Special Forces soldier John Matrix (Arnold Schwarzenegger) lives with daughter Jenny (Alyssa Milano) in isolation, but his privacy is disturbed by former commander Franklin Kirby (James Olson), who warns him that his fellow soldiers are getting killed one by one. After Kirby leaves, Jenny is kidnapped by former Latin American dictator Arius (Dan Hedaya), who wants Matrix to restore him to power. Instead, Matrix sets out to take down the rogue leader and rescue his daughter.

Directed by Mark L. Lester. Starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Rae Dawn Chong, Vernon Wells, Bill Duke, David Patrick Kelly, Alyssa Milano, Dan Hedaya. 

2. Conan the Barbarian (1982)

Orphaned boy Conan (Arnold Schwarzenegger) is enslaved after his village is destroyed by the forces of vicious necromancer Thulsa Doom (James Earl Jones), and is compelled to push "The Wheel of Pain" for many years. Once he reaches adulthood, Conan sets off across the prehistoric landscape of the Hyborian Age in search of the man who killed his family and stole his father's sword. With beautiful warrior Valeria (Sandahl Bergman) and archer Subotai (Gerry Lopez), he faces a supernatural evil.

Directed by John Milius. Starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, James Earl Jones, Mako, Sandahl Bergman, Max Von Sydow, Gerry Lopez.

3. Crimson Tide (1995)

After the Cold War, a breakaway Russian republic with nuclear warheads becomes a possible worldwide threat. U.S. submarine Capt. Frank Ramsey (Gene Hackman) signs on a relatively green but highly recommended Lt. Cmdr. Ron Hunter (Denzel Washington) to the USS Alabama, which may be the only ship able to stop a possible Armageddon. When Ramsay insists that the Alabama must act aggressively, Hunter, fearing they will start rather than stop a disaster, leads a potential mutiny to stop him.

Directed by Tony Scott. Starring Gene Hackman, Denzel Washington, Vigo Mortensen, Steve Zahn, Matt Craven, James Gandolfini.

4. Con Air (1997)

Just-paroled army ranger Cameron Poe (Nicolas Cage) is headed back to his wife (Monica Potter), but must fly home aboard a prison transport flight dubbed "Jailbird" with some of the worst criminals living. Along with Diamond Dog (Ving Rhames) and Baby-O (Mykelti Williamson), genius serial killer Cyrus "The Virus" Grissom (John Malkovich) unleashes a violent escape plot in mid-flight. Secretly working with U.S. Marshall Vince Larkin (John Cusack), Poe tries to foil Grissom's plan.

Directed by Simon West. Starring Nicolas Cage, John Malkovich, John Cusack, Steve Buscemi, Dave Chappelle, Ving Rhames, Danny Trejo, Colm Meaney.

5. Encino/California Man (1992)

California teen Dave Morgan (Sean Astin) is digging a pit for a pool in his backyard when he happens upon a caveman frozen in a block of ice. Aided by his goofy friend Stoney (Pauly Shore), Dave transports their discovery to his garage, where the Neanderthal thaws and is revived. When Dave and Stoney find the living and thoroughly bewildered caveman, they attempt to pass him off as a foreign exchange student named Link (Brendan Fraser), resulting in many misadventures.

Directed by Les Mayfield. Starring Brendan Fraser, Sean Astin, Pauly Shore, Megan Ward.

6. Starship Troopers (1997)

In the distant future, the Earth is at war with a race of giant alien insects. Little is known about the Bugs except that they are intent on the eradication of all human life. But there was a time before the war... A Mobile Infantry travels to distant alien planets to take the war to the Bugs. They are a ruthless enemy with only one mission: Survival of their species no matter what the cost.

Directed by Paul Verhoeven. Starring Casper Van Dien, Denise Richards, Neil Patrick Harris, Jake Busey, Dina Meyer, Michael Ironside, Clancy Brown.

7. Can't Buy Me Love (1987)

Nerdy high schooler Ronald Miller (Patrick Dempsey) rescues cheerleader Cindy Mancini (Amanda Peterson) from parental punishment after she accidentally destroys her mother's designer clothes. Ronald agrees to pay for the $1,000 outfit on one condition: that she will act as though they're a couple for an entire month. As the days pass, however, Cindy grows fond of Ronald, making him popular. But when Ronald's former best friend gets left behind, he realizes that social success isn't everything.

Directed by Steve Rash. Starring Patrick Dempsey, Amanda Peterson, Courtney Gains, Tina Caspary, Seth Green.

8. Ed Wood (1994)

Because of his eccentric habits and bafflingly strange films, director Ed Wood (Johnny Depp) is a Hollywood outcast. Nevertheless, with the help of the formerly famous Bela Lugosi and a devoted cast and crew of show-business misfits who believe in Ed's off-kilter vision, the filmmaker is able to bring his oversize dreams to cinematic life. Despite a lack of critical or commercial success, Ed and his friends manage to create an oddly endearing series of extremely low-budget films.

Directed by Tim Burton. Starring Johnny Depp, Martin Landau, Sarah Jessica Parker, Patricia Arquette, Bill Murray. 

9. Grosse Point Blank (1997)

After assassin Martin Blank (John Cusack) has trouble focusing on his work, resulting in a failed assignment, he returns to his hometown, Grosse Point, Mich., for his 10-year high school reunion. There he meets Debi Newberry (Minnie Driver), an old girlfriend that he stood up for the prom. Martin's secretary (Joan Cusack) sets up a hit for him while he is in town, but Martin starts to reconsider his life. Meanwhile, he is hounded by an unstable rival hit man, Grocer (Dan Aykroyd).

Directed by George Armitage. Starring John Cusack, Minnie Driver, Alan Arkin, Dan Aykroyd, Joan Cusack, Jeremy Piven.

10. Ladyhawke (1985)

Upon breaking out of a dungeon, youthful thief Phillipe Gaston (Matthew Broderick) befriends Capt. Navarre (Rutger Hauer), a man with a strange secret. Navarre and his lover Lady Isabeau d'Anjou (Michelle Pfeiffer) were cursed by the wicked Bishop of Aquila (John Wood), who desires Lady Isabeau for himself. His dark magic prevents the pair from ever being in each other's presence except at twilight, so they enlist Gaston in a dangerous plot to overthrow the Bishop and break his evil enchantment.

Directed by Richard Donner. Starring Alex Serra, Alfred Molina, Giancarlo Prete, John Wood, Ken Hutchison, Leo McKern, Loris Loddi, Matthew Broderick, Michelle Pfeiffer, Rutger Hauer.

Deep Dive to Survive: Torpedo: U-235 on Blu-ray, DVD & Digital from 8th March

Dazzler Media presents the epic, action-packed and suspenseful new war film Torpedo: U-235 on Blu-ray, DVD & Digital from 8th March.

In this epic cinematic adventure, resistance fighters accept a suicide mission to deliver uranium from the Belgian Congo in a stolen Nazi submarine to the United States. Hunted by Hitler’s army, the crew must outwit the German navy to bring the cargo safely to America.

Filled with exhilarating action, suspense and a great ensemble cast headlined by Koen De Bouw (The Last Tycoon), Thure Riefenstein (12 Monkeys) and Ella-June Henrard (Admiral), Torpedo: U-235 is one of the most exciting war films of the year, from new writer-director Sven Huybrechts.

Dazzler Media presents Torpedo: U-235 on Blu-ray, DVD & Digital from 8th March.

Pre-order on Amazon: www.amazon.co.uk/Torpedo-U-235-Blu-Ray/dp/B08WJN2SL9

Pre-order on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/movie/torpedo-u-235/id1552715356

Featured image  promo art: Torpedo: U-235, Dazzler Media, The Warrior Agency

Monsters of Man “Rambo meets Predator meets Terminator”

Monsters of Man is an action packed, suspenseful sci-fi thriller that reveals the terrifying dangers of sophisticated AI robotics used for military applications when a corrupt CIA agent (Neal McDonough – Minority Report, Captain America, Netflix's 1922 and Altered Carbon) conspires with a robotics company to field test highly advanced prototype robots with the aim of winning a lucrative military contract.   Their plan is to drop the robots into the infamous Golden Triangle to test their battle skills on unsuspecting armed drug cartels that no one will miss. The illegal mission is a disaster; haywire robots slaughter an entire village of innocent people. The brutal massacre is witnessed by a group of volunteer doctors on a goodwill mission. 

Everyone is considered collateral damage when you need to hide the truth!

Self-funded Director Mark Toia’s sci-fi action film ‘Monsters of Man’ is a ground-breaking result in independent film making – some called him mad at the start – but after seeing the film, the term “Maverick” was used in Australian news Sydney Morning Herald and Melbourne’s The Age.  The critics agree, he’s done a Hollywood film on an indie budget! How?!

Not only did Toia self-fund, direct, produce and do VFX for his highly ambitious sci-fi extravaganza, but he’s distributing it himself as well, rejecting all the big Hollywood offers that were made and to go it alone.  In the industry, these ideas are unheard of, is he actually crazy… or genius?  Time will tell. 

Crazy or not, he considers it as a commercial creative experiment as well as a calling card to Hollywood.  And with the many large scripts coming from around the world, the movie is already achieving the latter. 

Originating from a very successful career as an advertising photographer, Mark Toia was encouraged into directing TV commercials by his clients.  They implored him to bring his exceptional eye to the screen.  20 years on, Mark has become one of the world's most sought-after international directors and is now receiving scripts from Hollywood's finest.  Toia’s ability to deliver a stunningly artistic story full of drama through to shooting a fast and furious action piece is only a glimpse into what he can deliver.

Toia's legendary cinematography skills, vast post-production VFX knowledge, joined with his ever-evolving mind and machine-like work ethics make him the perfect choice for any film production.  His passion is to capture incredible performances within an image that emotionally compels. This combination puts him squarely at the forefront of today’s film & TV industry, and he’s touted as being the next hot property.

Featured image  promo art: Monsters of Man

Michael Jai White stars in Welcome to Sudden Death, available to own on DVD from 22nd February

Dazzler Media presents international action star Michael Jai White (Arrow, The Dark Knight, Black Dynamite) in Welcome to Sudden Death, available to own on DVD from 22nd February.

    Get ready for a fight-filled re-imagining of the Jean-Claude Van Damme 90’s action classic!

    Jesse Freeman (Michael Jai White, Arrow, The Dark Knight, Black Dynamite) is a former special forces officer and explosives expert now working a regular job as a security guard in a state-of-the-art sports arena.

    Trouble erupts when a tech-savvy cadre of terrorists kidnap the team’s owner and Jesse’s daughter during opening night. Facing a ticking clock and impossible odds, it’s up to Jesse to not only save them, but also a full house of fans in this highly charged action thriller.

    Welcome to Sudden Death co-stars Michael Eklund (The Call, Wynonna Earp) and Gary Owen (Ride Along, Think Like a Man).

    Dazzler Media presents Welcome to Sudden Death on DVD from 22nd February

    Featured image  promo art: Welcome to Sudden Death, Dazzler Media, The Warrior Agency

    10 Things About The Last Starfighter (1984)

    Released in 1984, ‘The Last Starfighter’, the story of a regular teenager (Alex Rogan) living on a trailer park who thinks he's just playing an arcade game and ends up saving the galaxy from the Kodan Empire, has gone on to become a firm cult favourite for sci-fi fans and children of the 80’s. So, here are 10 Things About The Last Starfighter.

    1. A failure to launch 

    Although the film is now praised for being ahead of its time and a firm cult classic, it didn’t have a stellar theatrical run. With an estimated production budget of $15m (which allowing for inflation would probably put it on par with the original ‘Star Wars’) the film failed to become the next global sci-fi phenomenon and only grossed $28,733,290 in the US. However, purely from experience and word of mouth, the film appeared to have a solid post big screen life on home video. It was one of the first VHS tapes my Dad rented for me from the local video store and it scared the hell out of me – the creature designs were exceptional for the time.

    2. Guest star

    Lance Guest (Alex Rogan) played the titular ‘The Last Starfighter’. Lance still has a love for the film and can be found meeting fans at sci-fi and comic conventions around the world. You might also recognise Lance from ‘Halloween II’, but most people will know him as ‘Michael Brody’ from the appalling, so bad it’s just plain bad, ‘Jaws: The Revenge’.

    3. Weekend at Centauri's

    Who likes ‘Weekend at Bernie’s’? The film is the butt of a joke in the TV show ‘Friends’, but it has a cult following - I rate it as one of my favourite films ever, something I am probably alone in doing so. Anyway, Catherine Mary Stewart, who plays ‘Maggie’ in ‘The Last Starfighter’, also played ‘Gwen’ in ‘Weekend at Bernie’s’. She also starred in the excellent cult sci-fi horror 'Night of the Comet', one of the coolest cult films of the '80s.

    4. Classic score

    Another part of ‘The Last Starfighter’ that stands out is the score. The film has a stunning soundtrack, one of the best of the 80’s. Although composer Craig Safan didn’t go from small sci-fi films to blockbusters, like James Horner who’s work on ‘Battle Beyond the Stars’ propelled his career as the composer went on to dominate the 80’s, Craig Safan did go on to compose the score for ‘A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master’ and you can see by the prices on eBay that ‘The Last Starfighter’ score is highly coveted.

    5. If you're gonna make a Star Car do it with some style

    The "Star Car", that ‘Centauri’ drives, was based on a DeLorean, including its gullwing doors, and its stainless-steel construction. This would mean the DeLorean would be the key inspiration for two sci-fi films in back-to-back years, with ‘Back to the Future’ releasing a year later in 1985.

    6. No return of the Starfighter

    The Sequel. Unfortunately, ‘The Last Starfighter’ never managed to get a sequel even though it left the story open at the end. However, over the years there has been a growing interest in producing a follow-up, either on the big screen or for TV. Names such as Seth Rogan and Steven Spielberg have been attached to rumours of a second adventure, but nothing has come of it yet. There is hope for fans though, as screenwriter Gary Whitta took to Twitter to share concept art for a sequel and said he was looking at making “a combination of reboot and sequel that we both think honors the legacy of the original film while passing the torch to a new generation.”, the 'we' part suggested the original writer, Jonathan R. Betuel, would be on board with the film.

    7. Underrated director

    ‘The Last Starfighter’ was directed by Nick Castle and this wasn’t the only cult film he was involved with, Nick was also the writer on ‘Escape From New York (a top 100 films ever candidate - personally). Plus, two years after his sci-fi epic, the director went on the helm ‘The Boy Who Could Fly’. A film that has been largely forgotten but was a mainstay of weekend television alongside ‘Flight of the Navigator’ and ‘D.A.R.Y.L.’ back in the day.

    8. No game, so just over

    The most disappointing aspect of the film was Atari letting fans down. The arcade giant promised that kids would get to the chance to defend the frontier against the ‘Kodan Empire’ and hope that it was secretly a test sent down by Centauri, so they too could join the ranks of the ‘Rylan Star League’ and become a Starfighter! But, alas, the game never made it to arcades as Atari was not confident the film would be a box office hit – they were kind of right but still probably could have made decent money from a quality space game.

    9. CGI innovations 

    ’The Last Starfighter’ is one of the earliest films to make extensive use of computer graphics for its special effects. In place of physical models, 3D rendered models were used to depict spaceships and many other objects. ‘The Gunstar’ (the now iconic Starfighter ship) and other spaceships were the design of artist Ron Cobb, who also worked on Alien, Star Wars and Conan the Barbarian.”
    This method for producing the VFX gave the film its unique look, but since it was the embryonic days of CGI, it didn’t look as awesome as the model work used in ‘Star Wars’. Really, it wasn’t until ‘T2: Judgement Day’ and ‘Jurassic Park’ that CGI began to work well alongside practical VFX. But there’s no denying that ‘The Last Starfighter’ was a trailblazer.

    10. The shape of it all

    The coolest fact was that the director, Nick Castle, was ‘The Shape’ in John Carpenter’s ‘Halloween’.

    10 Things About Krull (1983)

    Krull is AWESOME!!! It's one of those films that adults in the 80's didn't seem to get but kids loved when it was on telly! The film is a mashup of many influences, with the biggest two being 'Star Wars' and 'Lord of the Rings' and the Arthurian legend... what's not to love?! So, here are 10 Things About Krull.

    1. Carry On Krulling

    The late, great Bernard Bresslaw played the 'Cyclops' character. Bernard was most famous for his roles in the delightfully British 'Carry On' films that are still wildly popular. This was something I never knew at the time, it's only since IMDB I discovered this as he was under heavy makeup the entire time.

    2. Rising Stars

    The film's ensemble cast features Liam Neeson, Robbie Coltrane and a young Todd Carty, mostly known for his role on 'Eastenders', as part of the bandit gang.

    3. Director out of his depth?

    The director, Peter Yates, had helmed 'Bullitt' starring Steve McQueen and also directed the other Peter Benchley adaptation, 'The Deep'. Not exactly the same type of films as 'Krull', but that's probably why the film feels like a more gritty fantasy epic.

    4. Cashing in

    'Variety' described the movie as "Excalibur (1981) meets 'Star Wars' (1977) and that's basically what it was. The film was greenlit due to the grand success of 'Star Wars' as every studio wanted to have a global smash like it.

    5. 00-Krull

    For five months, a cast and crew of several hundred created the planet of 'Krull', inhabiting ten sound stages and exploring twenty-three different sets. One of those stages was the illustrious '007' stage at Pinewood studios, which was turned into the giant sand swamp with real quicksand pits.

    6. The Slayers

    The death screams of the 'Slayers' was a sound effect used in the awesome Doug McClure lead b-movie, 'At the Earth's Core' (1976). It's an ungodly sound and extremely distinct.

    7. Krull scores big

    James Horner's score is amazing. James Horner provided the epic score and would go on to compose the score to the George Lucas produced fantasy adventure, 'Willow' in 1988.

    8. The lead

    Coming fresh from the popular show, 'Marco Polo', the lead, Ken Marshall, looked like he could have been the Errol Flynn of the 80's. The actor had honed his talents at Juilliard alongside 'Superman' actor, Christopher Reeve. But, with the film's failure at the box office, he would not get another major role in the 80's. Which is a shame as his energy and screen presence was spot on for playing swashbuckling adventurers.

    9. The Glaive

    Considering the film flopped, see number 1 for how bad, 'The Glaive' has gone on to be one of the most iconic hero's weapons in cinema. It has been referenced in 'South Park' and more recently 'Ready Player One'. The film itself has also been referenced in countless films and shows.

    10. Mega budget headaches

    According to the internet, the estimated budget for 'Krull' was $47m, if true that's potentially more than the budget for 'Return of the Jedi' which had a budget of between $32m to $42m. This undoubtedly makes it a catastrophic flop considering its US gross was only $16.5m and a film with a budget that size would need to make at least in the region of $180m to have broken-even after the gross is split with the theatres and money for marketing added.

    Tin Star: Liverpool available to own on Blu-ray & DVD from 15th February

    Dazzler Media proudly presents Tin Star: Liverpool, the third and final season in the critically acclaimed Sky Atlantic crime series starring BAFTA winner Tim Roth (Twin Peaks, The Hateful Eight, Reservoir Dogs). It's available to own on Blu-ray & DVD from 15th February, and as part of Tin Star: The Complete Story boxset.

    Starring BAFTA winner Tim Roth (Twin Peaks, The Hateful Eight, Reservoir Dogs), the third and final season of the critically acclaimed Tin Star is the most thrilling, shocking and darkly comic rollercoaster ride yet, available to own on Blu-ray & DVD. 

    This season tells the story of Jack, Angela and Anna returning to Liverpool, where their story began twenty years ago, to face their deadliest enemies in a battle with the past to win freedom in the present. But instead, our heroes are forced to face up to the devastating and inescapable truth about who they really are.

    “Heart-wrenching, heart-stopping and hilarious” ★★★★★ CultBox

    “A gory crime caper laced with spiky Scouse wit” ★★★★ The Times

    “Deserves a wider audience” ★★★★ The Telegraph

    Dazzler Media presents Tin Star: Liverpool on Blu-ray & DVD from 15th February. Also available as part of Tin Star: The Complete Story boxset.

    Featured image  promo art: Tin Star: Liverpool, Dazzler Media, The Warrior Agency

    Hellraiser: Judgment and Hellraiser: Revelations on Digital Download 22 February

    From the depths of hell, horror icon Pinhead returns in the latest chilling chapters of the bloodcurdling Hellraiser franchise, created by horror master Clive Barker. With long-time series SFX artist Gary John Tunnicliffe at the helm, get ready for gore-soaked set-pieces and nightmare visuals that will tear your soul apart!

    HELLRAISER: JUDGMENT

    Hellraiser: Judgment finds two tough detectives, brothers Sean and David Carter, on the hunt for a gruesome serial killer terrorising their city with a series of murders based on the Ten Commandments. Joining forces with detective Christine Egerton, the trio dig deeper into a spiralling maze of horror that draws them into Hell to confront Pinhead and his evil Cenobite sect. 

    Starring: Heather Langenkamp (A Nightmare on Elm Street), Damon Carney (Fear the Walking Dead), Randy Wayne (Escape Room), Alexandra Harris (Secret Diary of an American Cheerleader) and Paul T. Taylor (Sin City) as Pinhead. Directed by Gary John Tunnicliffe (Hellraiser franchise).

    Blu-ray and DVD Special Features

    - Deleted and Extended Scenes

    - Gag Reel

    Cert: 18     

    Run time: 81 mins

    HELLRAISER: REVELATIONS

    When two American teenagers discover a familiar puzzle box in Mexico they unwittingly unleash an evil and deadly force: Pinhead, the sadistic cenobite from hell! A year later, the boys’ parents get together for a dinner in memory of their missing sons, but in the dead of night, one of the boys shows up at their doorstep, exhausted, terrified and hunted. Pinhead and his legion of Cenobites are closing in…

    Starring: Steven Brand (Mayhem) Sebastian Roberts (Mary Kills People) and Stephen Smith Collins as Pinhead. Written by Gary John Tunnicliffe and directed by Victor Garcia (30 Days of Night: Blood Trails, Return to House of Haunted Hill). 

    Cert: 18     

    Run time: 75 mins

    Hellraiser: Judgment is on Digital Download 22 February and Blu-ray™ and DVD 1 March from Lionsgate UK.

    Hellraiser: Revelations is on Digital Download 22 February and Blu-ray™ 1 March from Lionsgate UK.

    Amazon Blu-rays:

    Hellraiser: Judgment: https://amzn.to/2Lc9Ctb   

    Hellraiser: Revelations: http://amzn.to/2LujjDd 

    Featured image  promo art: Hellraiser: Judgment and Hellraiser: Revelations, Lionsgate UK

    10 Things About The Terminator (1984)

    James Cameron's 'The Terminator' is considered one of the greatest movies from the 1980s and furthered Arnold Schwarzenegger's meteoric rise to the top! The film is a full-blown classic, so, here are 10 Things About The Terminator.

    1. The Terminator, Rambo, Aliens and Conan

    The production of 'The Terminator' was delayed due to Schwarzenegger's commitment to the Conan sequel, 'Conan The Destroyer' (1984). With nine months spare, James Cameron was tasked with writing two sequels, a follow-up to 1979's sci-fi horror 'Alien' and a sequel to Stallone's critically acclaimed action-thriller hit 'First Blood' (1982). During this period, Cameron also revised the screenplay for 'The Terminator'. That's a hefty workload, especially as all three films ended up being hits and widely praised by fans; "James Cameron doesn't do what James Cameron does for James Cameron. James Cameron does what James Cameron does because James Cameron is... James Cameron."

    2. Less is more 

    A common criticism of some more recent films is how chatty all the characters are, constantly, the T-800 didn't have this problem. Schwarzenegger only has 14 lines throughout the whole film, which makes sense, he's a cybernetic assassin not a quip machine. This was even less than the 24 lines from 'Conan The Barbarian' (1982).  

    3. Film noir becomes "Tech Noir"

    James Cameron coined the term "Tech Noir" to describe films that take the tropes and elements of classic noirs and apply them to sci-fi, creating gritty sci-fi thrillers. The club in which the T-800 firsts attempts a hit on Sarah Connor was called Tech Noir as a nod.

    4. From fever dream to future war

    While shooting the infamous flaying fish movie, 'Piranha II: The Spawning', James Cameron caught something and as we all know, sometimes when you get ill you can have very bizarre dreams. During his bout of illness, Cameron had a dream in which a metallic torso with knives was dragging itself from explosion towards him. This one horrifying image from a dream would be the catalyst for 'The Terminator'. 

    5. A face in the crowd

    Originally, Cameron had conceived the T-800 infiltration unit to be depicted as just a face in the crowd; a killing machine in the guise of a regular looking person that could step out, kill, then vanish with little to distinguish them. This would be more logical as to why the units would be able to make it inside secure resistance bases. This concept art initially drafted used Lance Henrikson's likeness to convey this, however, while meeting with Arnold for the role of Kyle Reese, Cameron and Arnold hit it off and the director knew he'd found his Terminator, even though it would be a revised image of the character. James Cameron later said; "Casting Arnold Schwarzenegger as our Terminator, on the other hand, shouldn't have worked. The guy is supposed to be an infiltration unit, and there's no way you wouldn't spot a Terminator in a crowd instantly if they all looked like Arnold. It made no sense whatsoever. But the beauty of movies is that they don't have to be logical. They just have to have plausibility. If there's a visceral, cinematic thing happening that the audience likes, they don't care if it goes against what's likely." 

    6. Terminator pals

    During one of Kyle's dream sequences, the awesome future war scenes, we're shown a Terminator infiltrating an underground base. The future Terminator was played by Schwarzenegger's bodybuilding friend Franco Columbu who was also a multiple Mr. Olympia title winner. Columbu would also appear in 'Conan the Barbarian' (1982), 'The Running Man' (1987) and 'Predator' (1987).

    7. I'll be back

    Schwarzenegger was going to deliver the now iconic line "I'll be back." as "I will be back." The actor felt that it would be more machine-like and awkwardly formal to not contract the line. Cameron wouldn't budge on it and said "I don't tell you how to act, so don't tell me how to write". This would become Arnold's most enduring line and he would use it in many subsequent films. 

    8. Guerrilla filmmaking 

    With budget limitations, James Cameron would shoot much of the film "guerrilla" style. There are scenes shot on the streets of L.A. where the "extras" didn't even know they were in a film and scenes were shot quickly to grab the footage and leave. The scene in which the Terminator punches the window of a car to steal it, was done without permits so the crew rolled up, Arnold was quickly directed to walk up to the car and punch through the window without even thinking if it was safety glass or not. 

    9. Stan Winston 

    Stan Winston studios created the now iconic endoskeleton design. For close up shots, a head and torso was built that could be mounted on the shoulders of an operator who would be out of shot.

    10. No fate

    Originally, the film would have included an attempt to destroy Cyberdyne which would form the basis for 'Terminator 2: Judgement Day'. Cameron also considered the idea of a Terminator shapeshifting, but the stop-motion techniques at the time would never allow him to deliver his vision so that was put on ice and revisited once it was time for a sequel and Cameron knew CGI, after working on 'The Abyss', could achieve was he wanted. 

    10 Things About Predator (1987)

    Predator (1987) is one of the greatest and most iconic action movies ever to come out of the 1980s. It's got Arnie, Stan Winston creature effects, and subverts the genre, going full survival horror, so, here are 10 Things About Predator.

    1. Big Red Suit

    To achieve the cloaking effect, the special effects team used a bright red suit that could be keyed out in post. Normally these days you'll see green suits for actors that need to be removed from the shot in post but because of the setting, a jungle, the crew had to go with red as it was the furthest from green. The shots were then captured again without the actors using a 30% wider lens on the camera and optically combined. The wider lens caused the light bending effect.

    2. Production Van Damage 

    The concept of an apex, ninja like, alien hunter required a level of athleticism from the creature so the up and coming martial arts actor Jean-Claude Van Damme was brought in to put on the suit. This did not go well. The original suit design, which was eventually dropped as it looked like garbage, was not suited to Van Damme flexing his skills and was too hot so caused some tension on set. Van Damme would leave the production, with reports he was also fed up with the fact he'd signed on to be behind a mask, so Kevin Peter Hall (who can be seen at the end out of the suit as the chopper pilot) stepped in and got to don the iconic Stan Winston redesigned suit.

    3. If it bleeds, we can rave with it

    The famous line, "If it bleeds, we can kill it" has gone down in cinematic history. The effects team made the alien blood by combining KY Jelly with the liquid found in glow sticks. 

    4. James Cameron to the rescue?

    The initial suit for the 'Predator' was not what any of the filmmakers wanted to convey the strength and menace of the creature. Stan Winston was tasked with a redesign. During a vaguely unrelated conversation between Winston and Cameron, the director said "You know, I've always wanted to see something with mandibles." Winston ran with this and with other inspirations, created another of his iconic designs. The genius was Stan Winston, but James Cameron will always take a little credit. 

    5. Ol' Painless

    "Old Painless" was the handheld M134 Minigun used by Blain Cooper (Jesse Ventura) and would kick-start the most iconic ammo dump scene ever. The same minigun would show up again in 1991 used by Arnold Schwarzenegger in the 'Terminator 2: Judgment Day' during the shoot out at Cyberdyne Systems. 

    6. Predator Vision

    The Predator has an array of cool tech, other than the cloak, the thermal vision has to be the most iconic piece of gadgetry the alien hunter has for stalking its prey. For the thermal vision, infrared film could not be used because it did not register in the range of body temperature wavelengths. The filmmakers used an Inframetrics thermal video scanner because it gave good heat images of objects and people.

    7. OG Predator, you're fired!

    The original suit was designed by Richard Edlund from Boss Film Studios. Edlund had worked on the Star Wars movies and after Return of the Jedi wrapped, he founded Boss Film which delivered the fantastic special effects work on 'Ghostbusters' (1984). However, the concept for the first incarnation of the creature that was to hunt the special forces team was just not right and got the boot within days of hitting the set. A homage to the original suit can be seen in 2010's 'Predators'.

    8. Shane Black

    'Lethal Weapon' screenwriter Shane Black plays Hawkins, the first of the team to die, and added his quips and jokes to his character's dialogue. 

    9. Optimus Predator 

    The Predator was voiced by legendary voice actor Peter Cullen, best known as the voice of Optimus Prime. Cullen had voiced King Kong in 1976 and wasn't game for doing more guttural "animal" type voices but he agreed after seeing the Stan Winston designed creature. 

    10. Rocky Vs. Aliens

    A joke about Stallone's Rocky character started it all. By 1985, Rocky was one of the biggest movie franchises of all-time, and after 'Rocky IV', a joke was made that the only person Balboa hasn't fought yet was an alien (E.T. being referenced) and that was enough to spark the idea for what would become as classic as 'Rocky IV'.

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